Class Listing

The following classes are offered by the History and Political Studies Department. For class schedule information, visit Southern's course schedule.

International Development Studies

GEOG 204 World Geography—3 Credits
Maps, land forms, soil, mineral resources, weather, and climate are considered. Man's adjustment to various physiographic regions is studied. (C-2 credit for elementary education majors only). (Fall semester)
 
INDV 110 Human Rights and Service—3 Credits
This course examines the history of human rights and current human rights issues. Best practices of social entrepreneurs in the human rights arena are analyzed. An application is made to how Seventh-day Adventists individually and corporately can relate to human rights issues.
INDV 220 Global Politics—3 Credits
This course examines the politics of the global arena to foster understanding so that students can better serve the world's inhabitants. A comparison is made between secular international relations theory and a biblical worldview.
 
INDV 291 GPS Practicum—3 Credits
Practicum requirements include at least 150 hours at an organization approved by the course instructor and an in-depth reflection assignment on the practicum.
 
INDV 350 Sustainable Agriculture—3  Credits
Topics include examining sustainable agriculture through the lens of health and education as a means for maintaining ecological, societal, and spiritual balance. 
 
INDV 360 Political Economy—3 Credits
This course analyzes global economic institution and delves into political and social barriers to economic development. Practical skills in prosperity creation at the micro-level are discussed. 
 
INDV 370 Policies in Global Health—3 Credits 
Topics include best practices in health policy, management, lifestyle medicine, and community based development. 
 
INDV 491 GPS Practicum—3 Credits 
Practicum requirements include at least 150 hours at an organization approved by the course instructor and an in-depth reflection assignment on the practicum. 

 

History

HIST 154, 155 American History and Institutions—3 Credits Each
An introductory survey of the nation from colonial times to the present. The development of its politics, government, and social institutions is covered in each semester of the sequence. This course is recommended as general education for freshmen and sophomores. 

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HIST 174, 175 World Civilizations—3 Credits Each

A study of the development of Western and non-Western culture and government, emphasizing the evolution of European society and its interaction with non-European civilizations. This course is recommended as general education for freshmen and sophomores.

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HIST 278 History of Western Architecture—3 Credits

This course will trace the development of Classical and European architecture from pre-Classical Greece through the Modern movement before World War I. We will study artisitic periods, stylistic characteristics, and the historical cultural background.
 
HIST 297 Historiography—2 Credits
A course examining historiography, which is the study of historical consciousness and historical writing. The class will focus on Western historiography (classical, European, and the United States). This class may not be taken for General Education credit.
 
HIST 345 Middle Eastern Politics and History—3 Credits
This course traces the major religious and political developments in the Middle East from the rise of Islam through the twentieth century. Any or all of the following topics may be included: Islamic empires, Crusades, Ottoman nationalism, Islam’s encounter with the West, the issue of Islamic-Arab nationalism.
 
HIST 351 Colonial Latin America—3 Credits
Set in the context of Spanish empire and imperial ideology, the course begins with the cultural legacy of high pre-Columbian civilizations in Latin America and traces the interaction of the native people with Spanish exploration and conquest. It focuses primarily on Spanish political and social organization, the responses of the native people to growing Spanish political hegemony, and the gradual development of theories of race, empire, and faith which culminated in a recognizably unified Spanish American world.
 
HIST 353 From Colony to Nation—3 Credits
A detailed survey of American political and social history from 1607 to 1800, including the founding of the thirteen colonies, the American Revolution, and the establishment of the new nation.
 
HIST 355 History of the South3 Credits
A study of the American South from the Early National period through Reconstruction. Prominent issues will include slavery, sectionalism, the Civil War, and Reconstruction.
 
HIST 356 Natives and Strangers—3 Credits
A study of immigration and the role of ethnic groups in American society. Special emphasis on the tension between assimilation and pluralism in the national character.
 
HIST 357 Modern America—3 Credits
A study of American history from 1900 on with special examination of the Progressive Era, normalcy, the Great Depression, the New Deal, and the role of the United States in world affairs.
 
HIST 359 Transformation of American Culture—3 Credits
A topical approach to nineteenth- and twentieth-century American history, focusing on the modernization of life. Among the topics that may be covered are entertainment, the media, urban culture, social relations, transportation, and art and architecture.
 
HIST 364 Christian Church I: From the Early Church Through the Middle Ages—3 Credits
A study of the history of Western Christianity from the end of the apostolic period to the end of the Middle Ages, emphasizing both institutional and theological development.
 
HIST 365 Christian Church II: From the Reformation Through the Twentieth Century3 Credits
A study of the reorientation of Western Christianity, beginning with the Protestant Reformation and culminating with contemporary religious trends.
 
HIST 374 History of England—3 Credits
A survey of the history of Great Britain from Roman times to the twentieth century, emphasizing political, cultural, and economic developments which have influenced Western civilization as a whole.
 
HIST 375 Ancient Mediterranean World—3 Credits
A study of the three stages of ancient civilization, the Ancient Near East, Greece, Rome, and the contribution each has made to the development of Western culture.
 

HIST 380 Pirates, Captives and Slavery—3 Credits

A survey of piracy and slavery in the Altantic, Mediterranean and Indian Ocean worlds from 1500 to 1750. Readings will include captivity narratives as well as biographies of pirates and histories of the slave trade.
 
HIST 386 Rise of the West—3 Credits
A study of the religious and political life in medieval Europe. The focus will be on the ways in which diverse people interacted with each other militarily, economically, and socially in spite of their ethnic and religious differences. Special attention will be paid to toleration and persecution.
 
HIST 387 Europe in the Nineteenth Century—3 Credits
A study of Europe's "long century" from the French Revolution of 1789 to the beginning of World War I in 1914. The course traces Europe's development from a predominantly aristocratic and agricultural culture to an emerging democratic and industrial civilization, devoting particular attention to cultural and social change.
 
HIST 388 Contemporary Europe—3 Credits
An assessment of political development and international relations since the outbreak of World War I. Such antithetical forces as peace and war, power and weakness, and sovereignty and dependence are studied in their historical setting. Students may earn either history or political science credit, depending on individual assignments.
 
HIST 389 History of the Holocaust—3 Credits
A study of the historical and social circumstances leading to and surrounding the Jewish Holocaust. This course explores several theories of the event.
 
HIST 265/465 Topics in History—3 Credits
Selected topics in history presented in a classroom setting. Subjects covered will determine whether credit is granted in Area I or Area II. This course may be repeated for credit.
 
  • HIST 465-A World War I—3 Credits
  • HIST 465-B Presidential Leadership3 Credits
  • HIST 465-C American Foreign Policy—3 Credits
  • HIST 465-D Mark Twain and Gilded Age America—3 Credits
 
HIST 471 Classics of Western Thought I—3 Credits
A study of the key thinkers in Western thought from the Heroic Age of Greece to the Renaissance. Reading from original sources, this class will emphasize the discussion and analysis of ideas that have formed the basis of Western thought. Included in the readings are selections from Herodotus, Cicero, St. Augustine, Boccaccio, Montaigne, and St. Ignatius of Loyola.
 
HIST 472 Classics of Western Thought II—3 Credits
A study of the key thinkers in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Reading from original sources, this class will emphasize discussion of critical ideas that have effected the evolution of contemporary social and political thought. Included in the readings are selections from Locke, Mill, Marx, Nietzsche, Lenin, and Hitler.
 
HIST 490 Senior Exam Preparation—1 Credit
Independent study and reading in preparation for the assessment exam taken by senior history and political studies majors.
 
HIST 295/495 Directed Study—1-3 Credits
 
HIST 497 Research Methods—3 Credits
This is a class for history and archaeology majors which focuses on one major original research project.  Professionalization and discussion about linking faith with the discipline of history are also part of the class.

 

Political Science

PLSC 224 Principles of Macroeconomics—3 Credits

A study of economics as it affects the national interest. Specific topics include total employment, output and income, inflation and recession, and the variables that influence these conditions. Taught for political science credit through the School of Business and Management.
 
PLSC 254 American National and State Government—3 Credits
An examination of the operation of the executive, legislative, and judicial branches of government at the national, state, and local levels.
 
PLSC 345 Middle Eastern History and Politics3 Credits
This course traces the major religious and political developments in the Middle East from the rise of Islam through the twentieth century. Any or all of the following topics may be included: Islamic empires, Crusades, Ottoman nationalism, Islam’s encounter with the West, the issue of Islamic-Arab nationalism.
 
PLSC 353 From Colony to Nation—3 Credits
A detailed survey of American political and social history from 1607 to 1800, including the founding of the thirteen colonies, the American Revolution, and the establishment of the new nation.
 
PLSC 357 Modern America—3 Credits
A study of Twentieth-century political developments in the United States, focusing especially on the presidency, Supreme Court, and foreign affairs.
 
PLSC 388 Contemporary Europe—3 Credits
An assessment of political development and international relations since the outbreak of World War I. Such antithetical forces as peace and war, power and weakness, and sovereignty and dependence are studied in their historical setting. Students may earn either history or political science credit, depending on individual assignments.
 
PLSC 465 Topics in Political Science—3 Credits
Selected topics in history presented in classroom setting. Subjects covered will determine whether credit is granted in Area I or Area II. This course may be repeated for credit.
 
  • PLSC 465-A Moral Issues In Contemporary America—3 Credits
  • PLSC 465-B Presidential Leadership—3 Credits
  • PLSC 465-C American Foreign Policy3 Credits
 
PLSC 471 Classics of Western Thought I—3 Credits
A study of the key thinkers in Western thought from the Heroic Age of Greece to the Renaissance. Reading from original sources, this class will emphasize the discussion and analysis of ideas that have formed the basis of Western thought. Included in the readings are selections from Herodotus, Cicero, St. Augustine, Boccaccio, Montaigne, and St. Ignatius of Loyola.
 
PLSC 472 Classics of Western Thought II—3 Credits
A study of the key thinkers in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Reading from original sources, this class will emphasize discussion of critical ideas that have effected the evolution of contemporary social and political thought. Included in the readings are selections from Locke, Mill, Marx, Nietzsche, Lenin, and Hitler.
 
PLSC 291/491 Political Science Practicum—3-6 Credits
Supervised work experience in a state legislative, congressional, or other governmental office. A minimum of 50 clock hours for each hour of credit is required.
 
PLSC 292/492 Political Science Internship—9-12 Credits
Supervised work experience in a state legislative, congressional, or other governmental office. A minimum of 100 clock hours of work experience is required for each semester hour of credit.
 
PLSC 295/495 Directed Study—1-3 Credits
A course emphasizing individual directed study. The instructor to whom a student is assigned will determine whether credit is upper- or lower-division. This course also includes credit offered by the History and Political Studies Department on directed study tours. Writing emphasis credit for HIST 495 only. Approval of the department is required prior to registration.

 

Honors, Humanities, Education

EDUC 438 Curriculum and Content Methods/History—1 Credit
Admission to Teacher Education program is a prerequisite for EDUC 438. Attention is given to methods and materials of instruction, planning, testing, and evaluating student performances, and the survey and evaluation of textbooks.
 
HMNT 205 Arts and Ideas—3 Credits
A cultural appreciation class tracing the historical evolution of intellectual movements in Western civilization. The ideas and artistic accomplishments of leading figures in philosophy and the arts will be studied with illustrative examples of great works of art, literature, and music. (Spring semester)
 
HMNT 210 Introduction to Philosophy—3 Credits
An introduction to the major schools of Western philosophy, e.g. Platonic, Aristotelian, Medieval, Enlightenment, Hegelian, Analytical. The course will suggest how philosophy can help students think more critically and coherently. Issues of logic, epistemology, freedom of will, and ethics will be explored. Does NOT count toward a history major.
 
HMNT 215/415 Cross-Cultural Experience—3 Credits
A course for student missionaries assigned to a country other than the United States. Focuses on geographic and social characteristics. Activities include keeping a journal, writing a bibliographic essay and a research paper after return to campus. Students may register for this class while they are gone or they may take it when they return.
 
HMNT 251 Sophomore Honors Seminar1 Credit

HMNT 251 is required of students in the Southern Scholars program during their sophomore year. The Honors Seminar is an attempt to explore the values and ethics by which we order our lives and our communities. When everyone does their part, these classes can be among the most rewarding you will have in college.

 

HMNT 451, 452 Honors Seminar—1 Credit

1 HMNT 451, 452 class is required of students in Southern Scholars program during their junior or senior years. It is open to other students with permission of department chair. A study of great books in such fields as religion, philosophy, literature, and science, that have shaped Western culture (meets once a month in the evenings).