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Southern Offers Students Numerous Campus Job Opportunities 

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Yes 

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Ingrid Hernandez 

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Story Date

8/8/2012 

Story Abstract

Nearly five million dollars spent annually for student labor.

Story

In an attempt to ease the financial stress of paying for college—and to provide valuable life skills outside the classroom environment—Southern Adventist University invests about $4.75 million of its annual operating budget into student labor. This creates plenty of opportunities for students to work while they’re in school.

During the 2011-2012 academic year, more than half of undergraduate students worked on campus and those same opportunities exist again this fall. Many of the students who do not work on campus have purposely chosen to work off campus or not at all. A majority of students employed by Southern are hired for tasks such as food preparation and landscaping. Campus positions like these, and local business job postings, can be found on the Student Job Board.

Students searching for their first job at Southern are encouraged to look for what they can do, rather than restricting it to just what they want to do. Richard McNeil, senior theology major, said he likes working as a student web developer for Counseling and Testing Services because it gives him a chance to develop his skills outside of the School of Religion.

The single most important aspect of the job search process is a class schedule, since it sets the framework for student availability. Campus departments work with students to accommodate their academic commitments. Once employed, learning to balance these work hours with classes is beneficial for students in several ways.

“I think working through college helps them learn to manage their time and be more organized," said Jennifer Enevoldson, student employment coordinator. "Plus, it develops work skills that can translate once they’re done with school.”


By default, students who are employed through a campus department receive 25 percent of their earnings, while 75 percent of it goes to their school account. In some circumstances students may be able to change these percentages by speaking with their financial counselor.

Parents had positive things to say about their students’ employment experience in a recent survey administered anonymously via website forms.
 

  • “Student employment is very important for us. Not only is it financially essential for our daughter to work so she can afford to attend Southern, but we believe firmly that her academic performance is better when she works, and that learning to work well is just as important as learning to study well.”
     
  • “We are very grateful our son can work on campus to help with expenses and also meet people he might not otherwise have a chance to meet.”
     
  • “My son very much appreciates and enjoys his campus work. His supervisor has been a very positive influence on him and has helped him learn and experience skills that will be valuable for the rest of his life.”


Students who have been searching for a job but haven’t found one yet can stop by Human Resources and set up a one-on-one appointment for advice on their approach.

For more on student employment, visit southern.edu/hr.

 
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Created at 8/8/2012 6:45 PM  by Lucas Patterson 
Last modified at 8/8/2012 6:51 PM  by Lucas Patterson 
Southern Offers Students Numerous Campus Job Opportunities
by Ingrid Hernandez
August 08, 2012

In an attempt to ease the financial stress of paying for college—and to provide valuable life skills outside the classroom environment—Southern Adventist University invests about $4.75 million of its annual operating budget into student labor. This creates plenty of opportunities for students to work while they’re in school.

During the 2011-2012 academic year, more than half of undergraduate students worked on campus and those same opportunities exist again this fall. Many of the students who do not work on campus have purposely chosen to work off campus or not at all. A majority of students employed by Southern are hired for tasks such as food preparation and landscaping. Campus positions like these, and local business job postings, can be found on the Student Job Board.

Students searching for their first job at Southern are encouraged to look for what they can do, rather than restricting it to just what they want to do. Richard McNeil, senior theology major, said he likes working as a student web developer for Counseling and Testing Services because it gives him a chance to develop his skills outside of the School of Religion.

The single most important aspect of the job search process is a class schedule, since it sets the framework for student availability. Campus departments work with students to accommodate their academic commitments. Once employed, learning to balance these work hours with classes is beneficial for students in several ways.

“I think working through college helps them learn to manage their time and be more organized," said Jennifer Enevoldson, student employment coordinator. "Plus, it develops work skills that can translate once they’re done with school.”


By default, students who are employed through a campus department receive 25 percent of their earnings, while 75 percent of it goes to their school account. In some circumstances students may be able to change these percentages by speaking with their financial counselor.

Parents had positive things to say about their students’ employment experience in a recent survey administered anonymously via website forms.
 

  • “Student employment is very important for us. Not only is it financially essential for our daughter to work so she can afford to attend Southern, but we believe firmly that her academic performance is better when she works, and that learning to work well is just as important as learning to study well.”
     
  • “We are very grateful our son can work on campus to help with expenses and also meet people he might not otherwise have a chance to meet.”
     
  • “My son very much appreciates and enjoys his campus work. His supervisor has been a very positive influence on him and has helped him learn and experience skills that will be valuable for the rest of his life.”


Students who have been searching for a job but haven’t found one yet can stop by Human Resources and set up a one-on-one appointment for advice on their approach.

For more on student employment, visit southern.edu/hr.

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