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Art Exhibition Features Work Inspired by Nature's Complexity 

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Story Author

Shana Michalek 

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Story Date

9/24/2012 

Story Abstract

Emily Clawson, ’04, returns to campus with mixed-media showcase.

Story

“Aggregation,” a collection of 22 minimalistic pieces by Emily Clawson, ’04, is the School of Visual Art and Design’s first gallery showing of the new academic year. The September 27 opening begins with refreshments at 7 p.m. and the public is invited.

According to the Oxford Dictionary, “Aggregation” means a whole formed by the combination of several elements. The word works well to describe both the art and the artist in this instance. Clawson graduated from Southern with a Bachelor of Arts degree and then went on to earn her Master’s of Fine Arts degree from the Academy of Art University in San Francisco. Her work has been shown in several mid-western and western states, and she has studied and exhibited internationally as well.

Clawson’s artist statement for the exhibit speaks to this continuous growth:

“The art evolves ... and becomes an aggregation of observation, process, memory and personal narrative; created with conscious effort towards maintaining simplicity and inviting consideration of the interdependence of life and what sustains.”

Some of Clawson’s work being shown in the mixed-media exhibition is known as encaustic art, which describes the creation process of melting wax, adding pigment, and then manipulating the combination. This method has been used as far back as ancient Egypt and medieval Europe. The exhibit also features acrylic on wood, acrylic on paper, and an installation piece with many small, 3-D components cascading down the wall.

Giselle Hasel, assistant professor and director of the gallery, hopes her students will recognize the divine inspiration motivating Clawson’s work. The odds are high that this process will play out creatively in their own lives as well.

“Artists are constantly taking motifs and inspiration from God’s nature,” Hasel said. “Even the smallest elements are just rich with details.”

Clawson’s work will be featured in the John C. Williams Art Gallery through November 16. The gallery is located in Brock Hall on the campus of Southern Adventist University. For more information, call 423.236.2089.

 
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Created at 9/24/2012 5:28 PM  by Lucas Patterson 
Last modified at 9/25/2012 9:12 AM  by Lucas Patterson 
Art Exhibition Features Work Inspired by Nature's Complexity
by Shana Michalek
September 24, 2012

“Aggregation,” a collection of 22 minimalistic pieces by Emily Clawson, ’04, is the School of Visual Art and Design’s first gallery showing of the new academic year. The September 27 opening begins with refreshments at 7 p.m. and the public is invited.

According to the Oxford Dictionary, “Aggregation” means a whole formed by the combination of several elements. The word works well to describe both the art and the artist in this instance. Clawson graduated from Southern with a Bachelor of Arts degree and then went on to earn her Master’s of Fine Arts degree from the Academy of Art University in San Francisco. Her work has been shown in several mid-western and western states, and she has studied and exhibited internationally as well.

Clawson’s artist statement for the exhibit speaks to this continuous growth:

“The art evolves ... and becomes an aggregation of observation, process, memory and personal narrative; created with conscious effort towards maintaining simplicity and inviting consideration of the interdependence of life and what sustains.”

Some of Clawson’s work being shown in the mixed-media exhibition is known as encaustic art, which describes the creation process of melting wax, adding pigment, and then manipulating the combination. This method has been used as far back as ancient Egypt and medieval Europe. The exhibit also features acrylic on wood, acrylic on paper, and an installation piece with many small, 3-D components cascading down the wall.

Giselle Hasel, assistant professor and director of the gallery, hopes her students will recognize the divine inspiration motivating Clawson’s work. The odds are high that this process will play out creatively in their own lives as well.

“Artists are constantly taking motifs and inspiration from God’s nature,” Hasel said. “Even the smallest elements are just rich with details.”

Clawson’s work will be featured in the John C. Williams Art Gallery through November 16. The gallery is located in Brock Hall on the campus of Southern Adventist University. For more information, call 423.236.2089.

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