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Home > News > Animation Parable by Students, Staff Earns Rave Reviews
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Title

Animation Parable by Students, Staff Earns Rave Reviews 

Include as Feature

Yes 

Include as News

Yes 

Story Author

Luke Evans 

Story Image

 

Story Date

11/9/2012 

Story Abstract

Video goes viral, receiving more than 75,000 views since being posted on VIMEO.

Story

After a lengthy production filled with challenges and triumphs, the School of Visual Art and Design’s 10-minute animated film “Rock in the Road” debuted on VIMEO September 9 with 13,000 hits that first day. Since then, the video has been picked up by several mainstream sites and has currently been viewed more than 75,000 times.

The original script for “Rock in the Road” was written in 2007 by animation student Cory Goodwin, ’10. The story is set in East India, and centers around a boy attempting to get past a large rock the king has put on a mountainside road to test the character of his subjects. While the concept for the film seemed simple enough, the production turned into a five-year effort that faced numerous struggles.

“The project teetered on the edge of abandonment many times due to changing crews, story challenges, and format changes,” said Zack Gray, associate professor of animation. “Nevertheless, a small dedicated team decided that finishing the film was important.”

While the animation for the film was completed by 2010, there were still 120 shots to simulate, finalize, light, and render before the project would be complete. Melissa Caldwell, senior animation major, Daniel Cooper, ’12, and Yannick Amegan, ’11, made up the small, determined crew that continued to work on “Rock in the Road” until its completion this fall.

“This project has really showcased to the world the great talent that students and faculty in Southern’s School of Visual Art and Design possess,” said Isaac James, eCommunications manager at Southern. “Having this type of project be so well received online has been great exposure for both the crew who worked on it, and Southern as a whole.”

For more information, visit rockintheroad.blogspot.com

 
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Version: 3.0 
Created at 11/9/2012 3:25 PM  by Lucas Patterson 
Last modified at 11/9/2012 3:28 PM  by Lucas Patterson 
Animation Parable by Students, Staff Earns Rave Reviews
by Luke Evans
November 09, 2012

After a lengthy production filled with challenges and triumphs, the School of Visual Art and Design’s 10-minute animated film “Rock in the Road” debuted on VIMEO September 9 with 13,000 hits that first day. Since then, the video has been picked up by several mainstream sites and has currently been viewed more than 75,000 times.

The original script for “Rock in the Road” was written in 2007 by animation student Cory Goodwin, ’10. The story is set in East India, and centers around a boy attempting to get past a large rock the king has put on a mountainside road to test the character of his subjects. While the concept for the film seemed simple enough, the production turned into a five-year effort that faced numerous struggles.

“The project teetered on the edge of abandonment many times due to changing crews, story challenges, and format changes,” said Zack Gray, associate professor of animation. “Nevertheless, a small dedicated team decided that finishing the film was important.”

While the animation for the film was completed by 2010, there were still 120 shots to simulate, finalize, light, and render before the project would be complete. Melissa Caldwell, senior animation major, Daniel Cooper, ’12, and Yannick Amegan, ’11, made up the small, determined crew that continued to work on “Rock in the Road” until its completion this fall.

“This project has really showcased to the world the great talent that students and faculty in Southern’s School of Visual Art and Design possess,” said Isaac James, eCommunications manager at Southern. “Having this type of project be so well received online has been great exposure for both the crew who worked on it, and Southern as a whole.”

For more information, visit rockintheroad.blogspot.com

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