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Archaeology Lecture Explores Sanctuaries at Khirbet Qeiyafa 

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Luke Evans 

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Story Date

2/8/2013 

Story Abstract

Presentation highlights collaborative work between Hebrew University and Southern.

Story

Southern Adventist University joined the Khirbet Qeiyafa Archaeological Project in 2009 and helped advance numerous discoveries at this fortress-city in the highlands of Judah. Yosef Garfinkel, co-director of excavations at the site and professor of archaeology at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, will share some of the new evidence uncovered there during a February 12 lecture at 7:30 p.m. in Lynn Wood Hall Auditorium.

Garfinkel’s discussion focuses on artifacts that provide the first physical evidence of an Israelite religion during the time of Saul and David, and presents analysis of the cultic objects found during the dig (standing stones, altars, and libation vessels). Miniature shrines uncovered at Khirbet Qeiyafa, a particularly rare find, provide an important glimpse into the past.

“There's good reason to believe that these partially depict what full-size sanctuaries were like during biblical times,” said Justo Morales, Lynn H. Wood Archaeological Museum coordinator. “In theory, we might be looking at features similar to those of the Temple of Solomon!”

Garfinkel’s presentation highlights the ways in which collaborative work between the Hebrew University and Southern has revolutionized our understanding of the early history of Judah.

“It is important to continue to explore these sites in order to bring to life the ancient world of the Bible,” said Michael Hasel, director for the Institute of Archaeology at Southern.

A 6:30 p.m. open house at the museum will allow visitors the opportunity to speak with Garfinkel and Hasel prior to the lecture. Both events are free and open to the public. 

 

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The views and opinions of campus guests do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of Southern Adventist University. An individual's or group's invitation to speak or present on campus should not be regarded as a university endorsement of their philosophies and beliefs.

 

 
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Created at 2/8/2013 2:06 PM  by Lucas Patterson 
Last modified at 2/11/2013 2:57 PM  by Lucas Patterson 
Archaeology Lecture Explores Sanctuaries at Khirbet Qeiyafa
by Luke Evans
February 08, 2013

Southern Adventist University joined the Khirbet Qeiyafa Archaeological Project in 2009 and helped advance numerous discoveries at this fortress-city in the highlands of Judah. Yosef Garfinkel, co-director of excavations at the site and professor of archaeology at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, will share some of the new evidence uncovered there during a February 12 lecture at 7:30 p.m. in Lynn Wood Hall Auditorium.

Garfinkel’s discussion focuses on artifacts that provide the first physical evidence of an Israelite religion during the time of Saul and David, and presents analysis of the cultic objects found during the dig (standing stones, altars, and libation vessels). Miniature shrines uncovered at Khirbet Qeiyafa, a particularly rare find, provide an important glimpse into the past.

“There's good reason to believe that these partially depict what full-size sanctuaries were like during biblical times,” said Justo Morales, Lynn H. Wood Archaeological Museum coordinator. “In theory, we might be looking at features similar to those of the Temple of Solomon!”

Garfinkel’s presentation highlights the ways in which collaborative work between the Hebrew University and Southern has revolutionized our understanding of the early history of Judah.

“It is important to continue to explore these sites in order to bring to life the ancient world of the Bible,” said Michael Hasel, director for the Institute of Archaeology at Southern.

A 6:30 p.m. open house at the museum will allow visitors the opportunity to speak with Garfinkel and Hasel prior to the lecture. Both events are free and open to the public. 

 

--------------------
 

The views and opinions of campus guests do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of Southern Adventist University. An individual's or group's invitation to speak or present on campus should not be regarded as a university endorsement of their philosophies and beliefs.

 

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