Patricia Salazar

 

Field Experience Coordinator: 
   Teacher Education
   School Counseling

Education:

BA, Loma Linda University
MEd, University of Maryland


Contact:

Phone: 423-236-2024
Email: pcsalazar@southern.edu

Patricia Salazar is the Field Experience Coordinator for the Teacher Education  and School Counseling Programs. She has been an educator for over 30 years teaching at the elementary, secondary, and tertiary levels in public and private schools in California, New York, Maryland, and Tennessee. Her areas of expertise are first- and second-language acquisition, curriculum and instruction, performance-based assessment, and educational leadership. She has been published by the Journal of Adventist Education and presented at various professional conferences, including the Roundtable Conference at Oxford University, in Great Britain.

Professor Salazar is a graduate of Loma Linda University, La Sierra Campus, with a B. A. in Spanish and a minor in Bi-Cultural Studies. Her interest in linguistics and second language acquisition led her to complete a M.Ed. in Curriculum Theory and Development and Educational Administration at the University of Maryland in College Park. She is a doctoral candidate in the area of Educational Learning and Leadership at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga, focusing on predictors of academic success for English language learners.

As a supporter of global education and multi-cultural classrooms, Professor Salazar is committed to providing access and opportunity for every student to learn. “Every child deserves a champion: an adult who will never give up on them, who understands the power of connection and insists they become the best they can possibly be.” (Pierson, TEDTalks, 2013)

Ultimately, educators should remember that “True education does not ignore the value of scientific knowledge or literary acquirements; but above information it values power; above power, goodness; above intellectual acquirements, character. The world does not so much need men of great intellect as of noble character.” (White, Education, 1893, p. 225)