The School of Social Work at Southern Adventist University is passionate about raising awareness to the injustices we're facing in the world today. We invite you to take part by listening to our critical conversations and to join us in advocating for community healing and restoration.   
 

Shared Responsibility Part 1: A Conversation with Community Faith Leaders, Educators, and Law Enforcement

On October 12, 2020 a panel of local clergy, law enforcement, and educators from Southern came together to discuss systemic and institutional injustices. The virtual conversation highlighted the shared responsibility for all, especially Christians, to be a part of the change necessary for community healing and restoration. The conversation also emphasized the five-year collaborative research efforts of the Chattanooga Police Department and the School of Social Work. Through the lens of local partnerships, attendees developed faith in action as a tool for addressing issues while learning to apply a biblical framework for challenging biases. If you missed the opportunity to attend, the School of Social Work at Southern Adventist University warmly invites you to watch the recorded critical conversation on shared responsibility, by clicking here. 

Shared Responsibility Flier

Shared Responsibility Part 2: A Continued Conversation with Law Enforcement

Due to a significant response to the initial session, the School of Social Work hosted another conversation beween the Chattanooga Police Department and our community. This continued discussion addressed systemic and institutional injustices and focused on the research partnership between the Chattanooga Police Department and the School of Social Work: "Enhancing Law Enforcement Response to Victims" (ELERV).

ELERV highlights the integration of best practices in developing a victim-centered culture of police service. Presenters focused on elements of the five-year collaboration between the School of Social Work and the Chattanooga Police Department, data findings, and implications for current police practices while also providing practical suggestions for police accountability and citizen participation. The presentation was followed by a live Q&A. If you missed the opportunity to attend, the School of Social Work warmly invites you to watch the recorded critical conversation, by clicking here

Shared Responsibility II