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E.O. Grundset Lecture Series 

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Evonne Crook 

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Story Date

4/1/2013 

Story Abstract

The Winter 2013 Lectures Series has been announced. (Click on title for more information.)

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The Kappa Phi Chapter of the Tri-Beta National Biological Honor Society and the Biology Department of Southern Adventist University announces the Winter 2013 schedule of the E.O. Grundset Lecture Series. Lectures are hosted on Thursdays beginning at 7:30 p.m. in Room 3135, Hulsey Wellness Center.  There is no charge and the public is invited to attend.

 

Jan. 10 - Kanya C. Long, PhD, MHS, Andrews University, Berrien Springs, MI.  "From mosquito blood meals to public health priorities: Why vector competence matters."  Vector competence for a virus (how able a mosquito is to transmit a virus to another host) varies widely by mosquito species and virus system and plays a principle role in determining which mosquito-borne viruses have the greatest impact on public health.  Laboratory and field-based research on this interaction can provide insight into the ecological and epidemiological limits to virus transmission and how these limits may change under new conditions.

 

Jan. 24 - Robert Carter, PhD, Creation Ministries International, Powder Springs, GA.  "The Non-Mythical Adam and Eve."  Adam and Eve are the ancestors of all people who have ever lived. Evidence exists not only for Adam and Eve, but also for Noah's Flood and the Tower of Babel.  The history of this world is known from genetics.  Dr. Carter has spent years searching for clues in the book of Genesis that lead to the answer to the question of the origin of all peoples on earth.  He will talk about how modern genetics point straight to Genesis.

 

Feb. 14 - David Cowles, PhD, Rosario Beach Marine Laboratory, Walla Walla University, College Place, WA.  "Oddball Anemones and Photosynthesizing Bugs."  Research projects at Rosario Beach Marine Laboratory in Washington state involve undergraduate and graduate students.  Dr. Cowles has directed research with several anemone species, looking at their anatomy and molecular genetics to observe cross-breeding habits of species along the Pacific coast betwen San Diego and Rosario.  Other research has discovered a local isopod that captures intact plant cells or organelles from its diet and utilizes them for photosynthesis.

 

Mar. 14 - Scott O. Hodges, DO, Center for Sports Medicine & Orthopaedics, Chattanooga, TN. "Medical Research/Understanding Study Types and Drug/Implant Classifications."  From his years of research experience, Dr. Hodges will present a brief history of the role the FDA plays, including classification of drugs/implants and types of studies that help gain approval for surgical procedures performed in the US.

 

Mar. 28 - Hope Klug, PhD, University of Tennessee, Chattanooga, TN.  "Parental care, filial cannibalism, and the evolution of social behavior."   Filial cannibalism, the consumption of one's offspring, is an evolutionary conundrum.  Indeed, it is difficult to imagine situations in which consuming one's young represents an adaptive strategy, yet filial cannibalism is prevalent in animals.  Dr. Klug will discuss a range of ways in which filial cannibalism can potentially represent an adaptive strategy in animals and also how behaviors such as filial cannibalism can co-evolve with parental care.

 

Apr. 16 (Tuesday) - Students conducting research at Southern Adventist University will present their findings.

 

 
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Created at 1/22/2013 11:00 AM  by Evonne Crook 
Last modified at 5/2/2013 2:13 PM  by Evonne Crook 
E.O. Grundset Lecture Series
by Evonne Crook
April 01, 2013

The Kappa Phi Chapter of the Tri-Beta National Biological Honor Society and the Biology Department of Southern Adventist University announces the Winter 2013 schedule of the E.O. Grundset Lecture Series. Lectures are hosted on Thursdays beginning at 7:30 p.m. in Room 3135, Hulsey Wellness Center.  There is no charge and the public is invited to attend.

 

Jan. 10 - Kanya C. Long, PhD, MHS, Andrews University, Berrien Springs, MI.  "From mosquito blood meals to public health priorities: Why vector competence matters."  Vector competence for a virus (how able a mosquito is to transmit a virus to another host) varies widely by mosquito species and virus system and plays a principle role in determining which mosquito-borne viruses have the greatest impact on public health.  Laboratory and field-based research on this interaction can provide insight into the ecological and epidemiological limits to virus transmission and how these limits may change under new conditions.

 

Jan. 24 - Robert Carter, PhD, Creation Ministries International, Powder Springs, GA.  "The Non-Mythical Adam and Eve."  Adam and Eve are the ancestors of all people who have ever lived. Evidence exists not only for Adam and Eve, but also for Noah's Flood and the Tower of Babel.  The history of this world is known from genetics.  Dr. Carter has spent years searching for clues in the book of Genesis that lead to the answer to the question of the origin of all peoples on earth.  He will talk about how modern genetics point straight to Genesis.

 

Feb. 14 - David Cowles, PhD, Rosario Beach Marine Laboratory, Walla Walla University, College Place, WA.  "Oddball Anemones and Photosynthesizing Bugs."  Research projects at Rosario Beach Marine Laboratory in Washington state involve undergraduate and graduate students.  Dr. Cowles has directed research with several anemone species, looking at their anatomy and molecular genetics to observe cross-breeding habits of species along the Pacific coast betwen San Diego and Rosario.  Other research has discovered a local isopod that captures intact plant cells or organelles from its diet and utilizes them for photosynthesis.

 

Mar. 14 - Scott O. Hodges, DO, Center for Sports Medicine & Orthopaedics, Chattanooga, TN. "Medical Research/Understanding Study Types and Drug/Implant Classifications."  From his years of research experience, Dr. Hodges will present a brief history of the role the FDA plays, including classification of drugs/implants and types of studies that help gain approval for surgical procedures performed in the US.

 

Mar. 28 - Hope Klug, PhD, University of Tennessee, Chattanooga, TN.  "Parental care, filial cannibalism, and the evolution of social behavior."   Filial cannibalism, the consumption of one's offspring, is an evolutionary conundrum.  Indeed, it is difficult to imagine situations in which consuming one's young represents an adaptive strategy, yet filial cannibalism is prevalent in animals.  Dr. Klug will discuss a range of ways in which filial cannibalism can potentially represent an adaptive strategy in animals and also how behaviors such as filial cannibalism can co-evolve with parental care.

 

Apr. 16 (Tuesday) - Students conducting research at Southern Adventist University will present their findings.

 

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