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E.O. Grundset Lecture Series Fall 2013 

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Evonne Crook 

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9/4/2013 

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Open to the public. (Click on title to learn more.)

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The Kappa Phi Chapter of the Tri-Beta National Biological Honor Society and the Biology Department of Southern Adventist University announces the Fall 2013 schedule of the E.O. Grundset Lecture Series. Alumni are invited to join students for these complimentary presentations hosted on campus Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. in the Hulsey Wellness Center (except as noted below).

 

Sept. 19 – Jack Stout, PhD, Research Professor Emeritus of Biology, Andrews University, Berrien Springs, MI. “Serendipity and dogma: ‘unexpected’ behavior control (neuroethology) in a ‘simple’ animal.”
Simple animals have only a few neurons to control fairly complex behavior. Plasticity is currently a “hot” topic in the study of nervous system control. While vertebrates can dedicate numerous nerve cells to the control of a single behavior, simpler animals often use the same nerve cells for different behavioral purposes. Dr. Stout will talk about two different “multitasking” (plasticity) neurons in female crickets and the behaviors in which they are involved.

 

Oct. 10 – Lee Grismer, PhD, Professor of Biology, La Sierra University, La Sierra, CA.
“Using Phylogenetics to Discover and Conserve Unrealized Reptile Diversity in Southeast Asia.”
Conservationists tell us the vast majority of undiscovered species lie buried in remote regions of the world not yet explored. This is true to some extent; however, a surprisingly high degree of unrealized diversity lies buried in the remote regions of the DNA of many well-known species that are actually species complexes. This is particularly true for reptiles in Southeast Asia whose diversity may be underestimated by as much as ten-fold, which is an obvious impediment to their conservation.

 

Oct. 24 (8:00 p.m., Ackerman Auditorium, Wood Hall) – James A. Tucker, PhD, McKee Chair of Excellence, College of Health, Education, and Professional Studies, University of Tennessee at Chattanooga, 1962 alumnus of Southern Adventist University.
“The Ology of Ornithon.”
A recent survey suggests that bird-related hobbies have become the most popular outdoor activity in the United States, surpassing fishing and hunting. What is it about birds that make them so readily studied and enjoyed? Dr. Tucker, who is the founder of the American Birding Association, will discuss the study of birds as it relates not only to the technical and professional aspects of ornithology, but also to popular literature, media, sports, and religion.

 

Nov. 7 – Michael Morgan, PhD, Associate Professor of Biology, Berry College, Mount Berry, GA.
“Coral Reefs and Research.”
In this presentation, Dr. Morgan will demonstrate ways of integrating environmental issues with molecular techniques commonly used in cancer research.

 

Dec. 5 – David Lindsey, PhD, Professor of Biology, Walla Walla University, College Place, WA.
“Listening to the conversations of social amoeba.”
Cells communicate with each other by sending and receiving signals. To regulate group size and coordinate activities such as cell proliferation, cells use rather complex signal vocabularies to communicate. A social amoeba is used as a model to understand the nature of these conversations.

 

 
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Created at 9/4/2013 12:29 PM  by Evonne Crook 
Last modified at 9/4/2013 12:29 PM  by Evonne Crook 
E.O. Grundset Lecture Series Fall 2013
by Evonne Crook
September 04, 2013

The Kappa Phi Chapter of the Tri-Beta National Biological Honor Society and the Biology Department of Southern Adventist University announces the Fall 2013 schedule of the E.O. Grundset Lecture Series. Alumni are invited to join students for these complimentary presentations hosted on campus Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. in the Hulsey Wellness Center (except as noted below).

 

Sept. 19 – Jack Stout, PhD, Research Professor Emeritus of Biology, Andrews University, Berrien Springs, MI. “Serendipity and dogma: ‘unexpected’ behavior control (neuroethology) in a ‘simple’ animal.”
Simple animals have only a few neurons to control fairly complex behavior. Plasticity is currently a “hot” topic in the study of nervous system control. While vertebrates can dedicate numerous nerve cells to the control of a single behavior, simpler animals often use the same nerve cells for different behavioral purposes. Dr. Stout will talk about two different “multitasking” (plasticity) neurons in female crickets and the behaviors in which they are involved.

 

Oct. 10 – Lee Grismer, PhD, Professor of Biology, La Sierra University, La Sierra, CA.
“Using Phylogenetics to Discover and Conserve Unrealized Reptile Diversity in Southeast Asia.”
Conservationists tell us the vast majority of undiscovered species lie buried in remote regions of the world not yet explored. This is true to some extent; however, a surprisingly high degree of unrealized diversity lies buried in the remote regions of the DNA of many well-known species that are actually species complexes. This is particularly true for reptiles in Southeast Asia whose diversity may be underestimated by as much as ten-fold, which is an obvious impediment to their conservation.

 

Oct. 24 (8:00 p.m., Ackerman Auditorium, Wood Hall) – James A. Tucker, PhD, McKee Chair of Excellence, College of Health, Education, and Professional Studies, University of Tennessee at Chattanooga, 1962 alumnus of Southern Adventist University.
“The Ology of Ornithon.”
A recent survey suggests that bird-related hobbies have become the most popular outdoor activity in the United States, surpassing fishing and hunting. What is it about birds that make them so readily studied and enjoyed? Dr. Tucker, who is the founder of the American Birding Association, will discuss the study of birds as it relates not only to the technical and professional aspects of ornithology, but also to popular literature, media, sports, and religion.

 

Nov. 7 – Michael Morgan, PhD, Associate Professor of Biology, Berry College, Mount Berry, GA.
“Coral Reefs and Research.”
In this presentation, Dr. Morgan will demonstrate ways of integrating environmental issues with molecular techniques commonly used in cancer research.

 

Dec. 5 – David Lindsey, PhD, Professor of Biology, Walla Walla University, College Place, WA.
“Listening to the conversations of social amoeba.”
Cells communicate with each other by sending and receiving signals. To regulate group size and coordinate activities such as cell proliferation, cells use rather complex signal vocabularies to communicate. A social amoeba is used as a model to understand the nature of these conversations.

 

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