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Looking at Success Outside the Box 

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10/27/2010 

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I suppose that it is only fair, if I blog about Joshua, that he can write about me in an English paper. ‘Turnabout is fair play’ echoes that time-honored idiom.

“Success for some?” is a very thoughtful and thought-provoking essay on career choices. He argues, quite successfully I might add, that our current education system does not always adequately assess interest and compatibility to assure job satisfaction and success “Book knowledge”, he asserts is very different from experiential job training. He uses my story as an example of someone who trained for a very long time, but did not initially choose the specialty that was a good fit for her individual personality and interests. I am gratified that my past experience can be useful and educational to my sons.

His second and most persuasive argument is that our current education system stifles creativity. I find his reflections on his past educational pathway through Montessori, home school, and private schools to be very perceptive. And just maybe, some of those things that I did as a mother actually made an impression on my son. It is always rewarding to know that those times and experiences in the parenting trenches were/are worth it. Montessori education and home school encouraged Joshua’s love of learning by introducing him to a richly prepared, orderly educational environment and allowed him to progress at his own pace and rhythm.

Choosing an appropriate career pathway is paramount on every freshman’s mind, and Joshua is no different. The topic of a change of major has arisen in our conversations. The College Board website confirms that the majority of college students change majors once, and some more than once. Therefore, this is a discussion that may very well not end in the first semester.

So, I have been worried (That is what mom’s do, right, worry?) about helping our son to choose the appropriate, best major and career path. Putting together those three circles identified by Jim Collins in his book, Good to Great can be a daunting task. Can he find the career that genetically suites him, allows for him to support himself, and yet one for which he is passionate? After reading his thoughts on education, I am assured that he is well on his way to making the best choice. His ideas, while shaped by his past, are now maturing and forming into his own. He realizes the pitfalls and limitations that may loom. I now know that my role is to be supportive. It was a privilege to have a glimpse into his mind and to know that he is thinking “outside the box” about being successful.

 
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Created at 10/27/2010 4:21 PM  by John Shoemaker IV 
Last modified at 10/27/2010 4:21 PM  by John Shoemaker IV 
Looking at Success Outside the Box
October 27, 2010

I suppose that it is only fair, if I blog about Joshua, that he can write about me in an English paper. ‘Turnabout is fair play’ echoes that time-honored idiom.

“Success for some?” is a very thoughtful and thought-provoking essay on career choices. He argues, quite successfully I might add, that our current education system does not always adequately assess interest and compatibility to assure job satisfaction and success “Book knowledge”, he asserts is very different from experiential job training. He uses my story as an example of someone who trained for a very long time, but did not initially choose the specialty that was a good fit for her individual personality and interests. I am gratified that my past experience can be useful and educational to my sons.

His second and most persuasive argument is that our current education system stifles creativity. I find his reflections on his past educational pathway through Montessori, home school, and private schools to be very perceptive. And just maybe, some of those things that I did as a mother actually made an impression on my son. It is always rewarding to know that those times and experiences in the parenting trenches were/are worth it. Montessori education and home school encouraged Joshua’s love of learning by introducing him to a richly prepared, orderly educational environment and allowed him to progress at his own pace and rhythm.

Choosing an appropriate career pathway is paramount on every freshman’s mind, and Joshua is no different. The topic of a change of major has arisen in our conversations. The College Board website confirms that the majority of college students change majors once, and some more than once. Therefore, this is a discussion that may very well not end in the first semester.

So, I have been worried (That is what mom’s do, right, worry?) about helping our son to choose the appropriate, best major and career path. Putting together those three circles identified by Jim Collins in his book, Good to Great can be a daunting task. Can he find the career that genetically suites him, allows for him to support himself, and yet one for which he is passionate? After reading his thoughts on education, I am assured that he is well on his way to making the best choice. His ideas, while shaped by his past, are now maturing and forming into his own. He realizes the pitfalls and limitations that may loom. I now know that my role is to be supportive. It was a privilege to have a glimpse into his mind and to know that he is thinking “outside the box” about being successful.

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