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Who is the Enemy? 

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11/3/2010 

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Today I am writing about being a minority on campus - a non-Adventist. Officially the statistics cite that 95% of all students attending SAU are Seventh Day Adventists. I have no idea who all makes up the full 5%, but two of those 5% of students are my children. One is a son in his junior year in the School of Nursing, and the other is my daughter, Hannah, a freshman in the School of Music. While I prefer the label of "Christian", officially our family are all members of a Baptist church.

I welcome any questions from parents wondering if an Adventists school is appropriate for them as they wrestle with doubts and "well-meaning" friends, but for me the bottom line is that born-again Christians of other denominations are not the enemy! The spiritual atmosphere is excellent at SAU, the challenges few. My daughter is enjoying all the worship times, and loves the specialness of Sabbath. There is a huge array of Sabbath School classes from which can choose to attend, and then she and her older brother usually spend the afternoon together. They are too busy during the week to do more than give a passing greeting.

On Sunday they both attend an area Baptist church for the morning and evening services where Hannah happily plays her flute in that church's orchestra. No person, student or teacher, from SAU has ever said a single negative word regarding my children's desire to attend Sunday church. If there is a slight negative, it is only that at the end of Sabbath there are often many fun student activities like miniature golf, bowling, and such. Since Hannah has to get up early on Sunday morning, and the activities usually end a bit late, she often must forgo these fun social events in order to "rise and shine". These are life choices we must all make and I only see this as positive for her character.

For the most part denomination never comes up. My children find that most of the population of SAU assumes they are SDA, though there are the occasional clues that something is different. One lunchtime in the cafeteria Hannah was sitting with three other friends enjoying a lunch of "Haystacks". Hannah made the off-hand remark that they were very good and that she had never had them before. The other three students immediately stopped eating and just looked incredulously at her. One of them finally asked her how long she had been an Adventist. Hannah said, "I'm not". They all just gave a nod of "Ohhhh" and went back to eating. Hannah was mystified - but if you are reading this and are SDA - you will immediatley get the joke. Only later when she asked me about it, did she understand that this was a meal that Adventist families have eaten since about - birth!

 

                         

 
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Created at 11/3/2010 4:51 PM  by John Shoemaker IV 
Last modified at 11/3/2010 5:13 PM  by John Shoemaker IV 
Who is the Enemy?
November 03, 2010

Today I am writing about being a minority on campus - a non-Adventist. Officially the statistics cite that 95% of all students attending SAU are Seventh Day Adventists. I have no idea who all makes up the full 5%, but two of those 5% of students are my children. One is a son in his junior year in the School of Nursing, and the other is my daughter, Hannah, a freshman in the School of Music. While I prefer the label of "Christian", officially our family are all members of a Baptist church.

I welcome any questions from parents wondering if an Adventists school is appropriate for them as they wrestle with doubts and "well-meaning" friends, but for me the bottom line is that born-again Christians of other denominations are not the enemy! The spiritual atmosphere is excellent at SAU, the challenges few. My daughter is enjoying all the worship times, and loves the specialness of Sabbath. There is a huge array of Sabbath School classes from which can choose to attend, and then she and her older brother usually spend the afternoon together. They are too busy during the week to do more than give a passing greeting.

On Sunday they both attend an area Baptist church for the morning and evening services where Hannah happily plays her flute in that church's orchestra. No person, student or teacher, from SAU has ever said a single negative word regarding my children's desire to attend Sunday church. If there is a slight negative, it is only that at the end of Sabbath there are often many fun student activities like miniature golf, bowling, and such. Since Hannah has to get up early on Sunday morning, and the activities usually end a bit late, she often must forgo these fun social events in order to "rise and shine". These are life choices we must all make and I only see this as positive for her character.

For the most part denomination never comes up. My children find that most of the population of SAU assumes they are SDA, though there are the occasional clues that something is different. One lunchtime in the cafeteria Hannah was sitting with three other friends enjoying a lunch of "Haystacks". Hannah made the off-hand remark that they were very good and that she had never had them before. The other three students immediately stopped eating and just looked incredulously at her. One of them finally asked her how long she had been an Adventist. Hannah said, "I'm not". They all just gave a nod of "Ohhhh" and went back to eating. Hannah was mystified - but if you are reading this and are SDA - you will immediatley get the joke. Only later when she asked me about it, did she understand that this was a meal that Adventist families have eaten since about - birth!

 

                         

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