Stefanie Kulik

Not Just Genetics: A Comparison of Family Structures in Addictive Behavior

Alcohol and drug use are becoming normative behaviors of adolescents today, but research has done little to evaluate the impact of family structure on these behaviors. The purpose of this study was to examine differences in family structure and levels of addictive behavior in young adults. Participants consisted of 40 students from a private university in southeast Tennessee. The survey used for the purpose of this study was the Kulik Addictive Behaviors and Family Life Instrument (KABFLI). Two hypotheses and three research questions were tested in this study, which consisted of examining differences in family structure, gender, religious ideology, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status in levels of addictive behavior. The results show that addictive behavior is not influenced by family structure, gender, religious ideology, ethnicity, or socioeconomic status in this sample. These inconclusive findings call for more research with larger samples and better design.